上一级

讨论区

本书首页    Previous    Next    Chinese


Scene Two 

A room in the castle

 

[Enter KING CLAUDIUSQUEEN GERTRUDE

ROSENCRANTZGUILDENSTRERNand Attendants]

KING CLAUDIUS

Welcomedear Rosencrantz and Guildenstern

Moreover that we much did long to see you

The need we have to use you did provoke

Our hastysendingSomething have you heard

Of Hamlet's transformationso call it

Sithnor the exterior nor the inward man

Resemblesthat it wasWhat it should be

More than his father's deaththat thus hath put him

So much from the understanding of himself

I cannot dream ofI entreat you both

Thatbeing of so young days brought up with him

And sith so neighbour'd to his youth and havior

That you vouchsafe your rest here in our court

Some little timeso by your companies

To draw him on to pleasuresand to gather

So much as from occasion you may glean

Whether aughtto us unknownafflicts him thus

Thatopen'dlies within our remedy

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Good gentlemenhe hath much talk'd of you

And sure I am two men there are not living

To whom he more adheresIf it will please you

To show us so much gentry and good will

As to expend your time with us awhile

For the supply and profit of our hope

Your visitation shall receive such thanks

As fits a king's remembrance

ROSENCRANTZ

Both your majesties

Mightby the sovereign power you have of us

Put your dread pleasures more into command

Than to entreaty

GUILDENSTERN

But we both obey

And here give up ourselvesin the full bent

To lay our service freely at your feet

To be commanded

KING CLAUDIUS

ThanksRosencrantz and gentle Guildenstern

QUEEN GERTRUDE

ThanksGuildenstern and gentle Rosencrantz

And I beseech you instantly to visit

My too much changed sonGosome of you

And bring these gentlemen where Hamlet is

GUILDENSTERN

Heavens make our presence and our practises

Pleasant and helpful to him

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Ayamen

[Exeunt ROSENCRANTZGUILDENSTERNEand some Attendants]

[Enter POLONIUS]

LORD POLONIUS

The ambassadorsfrom Norwaymy good lord

Are joyfully return'd

KING CLAUDIUS

Thou still hast been the father of good news

LORD POLONIUS

Have Imy lordI assuremy good liege

I hold my dutyas I hold my soul

Both to my God and to my graciousking

And I do thinkor else this brain of mine

Hunts not the trail of policy so sure

As it hath used to dothat I have found

The very cause of Hamlet's lunacy

KING CLAUDIUS

Ospeak of thatthat do I longto hear

LORD POLONNIUS

Give first admittance to the ambassadors

My news shall be the fruit to that great feast

KING CLAUDIUS

Thyself do grace to themand bring them in

[Exit POLONIUS]

He tells memy dear Gertrudehe hath found

The head and source of all your son's distemper

QUEEN GERTRUDE

I doubt it is no other but the main

His father's deathand our o>erhasty marriage

KING CLAUDIUS

Wellwe shall sift him

[Re-enter POLONIUSwith VOLTIMAND and CORNELIUS]

Welcomemy good friends

SayVoltimandwhat from our brother Norway

VOLTIMAND

Most fair return of greetings and desires

Upon our firsthe sent out to suppress

His nephew's levieswhich to him appear'd

To be a preparation>gainst the Polack

Butbetter look'd intohe truly found

It was against your highnesswhereat grieved

That so his sicknessage and impotence

Was falsely borne in handsends out arrests

On Fortinbraswhich hein briefobeys

Receives rebuke from Norwayand in fine

Makes vow before his uncle never more

To give the assay of arms against your majesty

Whereon old Norwayovercome with joy

Gives him three thousand crowns in annual fee

And his commission to employ those soldiers

So levied as beforeagainst the Polack

With an entreatyherein further shown

[Giving a paper]

That it might please you to give quiet pass

Through your dominions for this enterprise

On such regards of safety and allowance

As therein are set down

KING CLAUDIUS

It likes us well

And at our more consider'd time well read

Answerand think upon this business

Meantime we thank you for your welltook labour

Go to your restat night we>ll feast together

Most welcome home

[Exeunt VOLTIMAND and CORNELIUS]

LORD POLONIUS

This business is well ended

My liegeand madamto expostulate

What majesty should bewhat duty is

Why day is daynight nightand time is time

Were nothing but to waste nightday and time

Thereforesince brevityis the soul of wit

And tediousnessthe limbsand outward flourishes

I will be briefyour noble son is mad

Mad call I itfofto define true madness

What is>t but to be nothing else but mad

But let that go

QUEEN GERTRUDE

More matterwith less art

LORD POLONIUS

MadamI swear I use no art at all

That he is mad>tis true>tis true >tis pity

And pity >tis >tis truea foolish figure

But farewell itfor I will use no art

Mad let us grant himthenand now remains

That we find out the cause of this effect

Or rather saythe cause of this defect

For this effect defectivecomes by cause

Thus it remainsand the remainderthusPerpend

I have a daughter——have while she is mine——

Whoin her duty and obediencemark

Hath given me thisnow gatherand surmise

[Reads]

>To the celestial and my soul's idolthe most

beautified Ophelia>——

That's an ill phrasea vile phrase>beautified>is

a vile phrasebut you shall hearThus

[Reads]

>In her excellent white bosomthese,&c>

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Came this from Hamlet to her

LORD POLONIUS

Good madamstay awhileI will be faithful

[Reads]

'doubt thou the stars are fire

Doubt that the sun doth move

Doubt truth to be a liar

But never doubt I love

>O dear OpheliaI am ill at these numbers

I have not art reckon my groansbut that

I love thee bestO most bestbelieve itAdieu

>Thine evermore most dear ladywhilst

this machine is to himHAMLET>

Thisin obediencehath my daughter shown me

And more abovehath his solicitings

As they fell out by timeby means and place

All given to mine ear

KING CLAUDIUS

But how hath she

Received his love

LORD POLONIUS

What do you think of me

KING CLAUDIUS

As of a man faithful and honourable

LORD POLONIUS

I would fain prove soBut what might you think

When I had seen this hot love on the wing——

As I perceived itI must tell you that

Before my daughter told me——what might you

Or my dear majesty your queen herethink

If I had play'd the desk or tablebook

Or given my heart a winkingmute and dumb

Or look'd upon this love with idle sight

What might you thinkNoI went round to work

And my young mistress thus I did bespeak

>Lord Hamlet is a princeout of thy star

This must not be>and then I precepts gave her

That she should lock herself from his resort

Admit no messengersreceive no tokens

Which doneshe took the fruits of my advice

And herepulsed——a short tale to make——

Fell into a sadnessthen into a fast

Thence to a watchthence into a weakness

Thence to a lightnessandby this declension

Into the madness wherein now he raves

And all we mourn for

KING CLAUDIUS

Do you think >tis this

QUEEN GERTRUDE

It may bevery likely

LORD POLONIUS

Hath there been such a time——I'd fain know that——

That I have positively said >Tis so>

When it proved otherwise

KING CLAUDIUS

Not that I know

LORD POLONIUS

[Pointing to his head and shoulder]

Take this from thisif this be otherwise

If circumstances lead meI will find

Where truth is hidthough it were hid indeed

Within the centre

KING CLAUDIUS

How may we try it further

LORD POLONIUS

You knowsometimes he walks four hours together

Here in the lobby

QUEEN GERTRUDE

So he does indeed

LORD POLONIUS

At such a time I>ll loose my daughter to him

Be you and I behind an arras then

Mark the encounterif he love her not

And be not from his reason fall>n thereon

Let me be no assistant for a state

But keep a farm and carters

KING CLAUDIUS

We will try it

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Butlookwhere sadly the poor wretch comes reading

LORD POLONIUS

AwayI do beseech youboth away

I>ll board him presently

[Exeunt KING CLAUDIUSQUEEN GERTRUDEand Attendants]

[Enter HAMLETreading]

Ogive me leave

How does my good Lord Hamlet

HAMLET

WellGodamercy

LORD POLONIUS

Do you know memy lord

HAMLET

Excellent wellyou are a fishmonger

LORD POLONIUS

Not Imy lord

HAMLET

Then I would you were so honest a man

LORD POLONIUS

Honestmy lord

HAMLET

Aysirto be honestas this world goesis to be

one man picked out of ten thousand

LORD POLONIUS

That's very truemy lord

HAMLET

For if the sun breed maggots in a dead dogbeing a

god kissing carrion,——Have you a daughter

LORD POLONIUS

I havemy lord

HAMLET

Let her not walk i>thesunconceptionis a

blessingbut not as your daughter may conceive

Friendlook to>t

LORD POLONIUS

[Aside]How say you by thatStill harpingon my

daughteryet he knew me not at firsthe said I was a

fishmongerhe is far gonefar goneand truly in my youth I

suffered much extremityfor lovevery near thisI>ll speak to

him again

What do you readmy lord

HAMLET

Wordswordswords

LOPRD POLONIUS

What is the mattermy lord

HAMLET

Between who

LORD POLONIUS

I meanthe matter that you readmy lord

HAMLET

Slanderssirfor the satirical rogue says here

that old men have grey beardsthat their faces are

wrinkledtheir eyes purging thick amber and

plumtree gum and that they have a plentiful lack of

wittogether with most weak hamsall whichsir

though I most powerfully and potently believeyet

I hold it not honesy to have it thus set downfor

yourselfsirshould be old as I amif like a crab

you could go backward

LORD POLONIUS

[Aside]Though this be madnessyet there is method

in>tWill you walk out of the airmy lord

HAMLET

Into my grave

LORD POLONIUS

Indeedthst is out o>the air

[Aside]

How pregnant sometimes his replies area happiness

that often madness hits onwhich reason and sanity

could not so prosperously be delivered ofI will

leave himand suddenly contrive the means of

meeting between him and my daughter.——My honourable

lordI will most humbly take my leave of you

HAMLET

You cannotsirtake from me any thing that I will

more willingly part withalexcept my lifeexcept  

my lifeexcept my life

LORD POLONIUS

Fare you wellmy lord

HAMLET

These tedious old fools

[Enter ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN]

LORD POLONIUS

You go to seek the Lord Hamletthere he is

ROSENCRANTZ

[To POLONIUS]God save yousir

[Exit POLONIUS]

GUILDENSTERN

My honoured lord

ROSENCRANTZ

My most dear lord

HAMLET

My excellent good friendsHow dost thou

GuildenstemAhRosencrantzGood ladshow do ye

both

ROSENCRANTZ

As the indifferent children of the earth

GUILDENSTERN

Happyin that we are not over-happy

On fortune's cap we are not the very button

HAMLET

Nor the soles of her shoe

ROSENCRANTZ

Neithermy lord

HAMLET

Then you live about her waistor in the middle ofher favours

GUILDENSTERN

>Faithher privates we

HAMLET

In secret perts of fortuneOmost trueshe

is a strumpetWhat's the news

ROSENCRANTZ

Nonemy lordbut that me world's grown honest

HAMLET

Then is doomsday nearbut your news is not true

Let me question more in particularwhat have you  

my good friendsdeserved at the bands of fortune

that she sends you to prison hither

GUILDENSTERN

Prisonmy lord

HAMLET

Denmark's a prison

ROSENCRANTZ

Then is the word one

HAMLET

A goodly onein which there are many confines

wards and dungeonsDenmark being one o>the worst

ROSENCRANTZ

We think not somy lord

HAMLET

Whythen>tis none to youfor there is nothing

either good or badbut thinking makes it soto me

it is a prison

ROSENCRANTZ

Why thenyour ambition makes it one>tis too

narrow for your mind

HAMLET

O GodI could be bounded in a nut shell and count

myself a king of infinite spacewere it not that I

have bad dreams

GUILDENSTERLN

Which dreams indeed are ambitionfor the very

substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream

HAMLET

A dream itself is but a shadow

ROSENCRANTZ

Trulyand I hold ambition of so airy and light a

quality that it is but a shadow's shadow

HAMLET

Then are our beggars bodiesand our monarchs and

outstretched heroes the beggars> shadows Shall we

to the courtforby my fayI cannot reason

ROSENCRANTZ

GUILDENSTERN

We>ll wait upon you

HAMLET

No such matterI will not sort you with the rest

of my servantsforto speak to you like an honest

manI am most dreadfully attendedButin the

beaten way of friendshipwhat make you at Elsinore

ROSENCRANTZ

To visit youmy lordno other occasion

HAMLET

Beggar that I amI am even poor in thanksbut I

thank youand suredear friendsmy thanks are

too dear a halfpennyWere you not sent forIs it

your own incliningIs it a free visitationCome

deal justly with mecomecomenayspeak

GUILDENSTERN

What should we saymy lord

HAMLET

Whyany thingbut to the purposeYou were sent

forand there is a kind of confession in your looks

which your modesties have not craft enough to colour

I know the good king and queen have sent for you

ROSENCRANTZ

To what endmy lord

HAMLET

That you must teach meBut let me conjure youby

the rights of our fellowshipby the consonancy of

our youthby the obligation of our ever-preserved

loveand by what more dear a better proposer could charge you

withalbe even and direct with me

whether you were sent foror no

ROSENCRANTZ

[Aside to GUILDENSTERN]What say you

HAMLET

[Aside]NaythenI have an eye of you.——If you love mehold not off

GUILDENSTERN

My lordwe were sent for

HAMLET

I will tell you whyso shall my anticipation

prevent your discoveryand your secrecy to the king

and queen moult no featherI have of late——but

wherefore I know not——lost all my mirthforgone all

custom of exercisesand indeed it goes so heavily

with my disposition that this goodly framethe

earthseems to me a sterile promontorythis most

excellent canopythe airlook youthis brave

o>erhanging firmamentthis majestical roof fretted

with golden firewhyit appears no other thing to

me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours

What a piece of work is a manhow noble in reason how

infinite in facultyin form and moving how

express and admirablein action how like an angel

in apprehension how like a godthe beauty of the

worldthe paragon of animalsAnd yetto me

what is this quintessence of dustman delights not

menonor woman neitherthough by your smiling

you seem to say so

ROSENCRANTZ

My lordthere was no such stuff in my thoughts

HAMLET

Why did you laugh thenwhen I said >man delights not me>

ROSENCRANTZ

To thinkmy lordif you delight in manwhat

lenten entertainment the players shall receive from

youwe coted them on the wayand hither are they

comingto offer you service

HAMLET

He that plays the king shall be welcomehis majesty

shall have tribute of methe adventurous knight

shall use his foil and targetthe lover shall not

sigh gratisthe humourous man shall end his part

in peacethe clown shall make those laugh whose

lungs are tickled o>the sereand the lady shall

say her mind freelyor the blank verse shall halt

for>tWhat players are they

ROSENCRANTZ

Even those you were wont to take delight inthe tragedians of the city

HAMLET

How chances it they traveltheir residenceboth

in reputation and profitwas better both ways

ROSENCRANTZ

I think their inhibition comes by the means of the

late innovation

HAMLET

Do they hold the same estimation they did when I was

in the cityare they so followed

ROSENCRANTZ

Noindeedare they not

HAMLET

How comes itdo they grow rusty

ROSENCRANTZ

Naytheir endeavourkeeps in the wonted pacebut

there issiran aery of childrenlittle eyases

that cry out on the top of questionand are most

tyrannically clapped for>tthese are now the

fashionand so berattle the common stages——so they

call them——that many wearing rapiers are afraid of

goosequills and dare scarce come thither

HAMLET

Whatare they childrenwho maintains >emhow are

they escotedWill they pursue the quality no

longer than they can singwill they not say

afterwardsif they should grow themselves to common

players——as it is most likeif their means are no

better——their writers do them wrongto make them

exclaim against their own succession

ROSENCRANTZ

>Fiththere has been much to do on both sidesand

the nation holds it no sin to tarre them to

controversy there wasfor a whileno money bid

for argumentunless the poet and the player went to

cuffs the question

HAMLET

Is>t possible

GUILDENSTERN

Othere has been much throwing about of brains

HAMLET

Do the boys carry it away

ROSENCRANTZ

Aythat they domy lordHercules and his load too

HAMLET

It is not very strangefor mine uncle is king of

Denmarkand those that would make mows at him while

my father livedgive twentyfortyfiftyan

hundred ducats apiece for his picture in little

'sbloodthere is something in this more than

naturalif philosophy could find it out

[Flourish of trumpets within]

GUILDENSTERN

There are the players

HAMLET

Gentlemenyou are welcome to ElsinoreYour hands

come thenthe appurtenance of welcome is fashion

and ceremonylet me comply with you in this garb

lest my extent to the playerswhichI tell you

must show fairly outwardshould more appear like

entertainment than yoursYou are welcomebut my

uncle-father and aunt-mother are deceived

GUILDENSTERN

In whatmy dear lord

HAMLET

I am but mad north-th-westwhen the wind is

southerly I know hawk from a handsaw

[Enter POLONIUS]

LORD POLONIUS

Well be with yougentlemen

HAMLET

Hark youGuildensternand you tooat each ear a  

hearerthat great baby you see there is not yet

out of his swaddlingclouts

ROSENCRANTZ

Happily he's the second time come to themfor they

say an old man is twice a child

HAMLET

I will prophesy he comes to tell me of the players

mark itYou say rightsiro> Monday morning

>twas so indeed

LORD POLONIUS

My lordI have news to tell you

HAMLET

My lordI have news to tell you

When Roscius was an actor in Rome,——

LORD POLONIUS

The actors are come hithermy lord

HAMLET

Buzbuz

LORD POLONIUS

Upon mine honour,——

HAMLET

Then came each actor on his ass,——

LORD POLONIUS

The best actors in the worldeither for tragedy

comedyhistorypastoralpastoral-comical

historical-pastoraltragical-historicaltragical-

comical-historical-pastoralscene individableor

poem unlimitedSeneca cannot be too heavynor

Plautus too lightFor the law of writ and the libertythese

are the only men

HEMLET

O Jephthahjudgeof Israelwhat a treasure hadst thou

LORD POLONIUS

What a treasure had hemy lord

HAMLET

Why

>One fair daughter and no more

The which he loved passing well>

LORD POLONIUS

[Aside]Still on my daughter

HAMLET

Am I not i>the rightold Jephthah

LORD POLONIUS

If you call me Jephthahmy lordI have a daughter

that I love passing well

HAMLET

Naythat follows not

LORD POLONIUS

What followsthenmy lord

HAMLET

Why

>As by lotGod wot>and thenyou know

>It came to passas most like it was>——

the first row of the piouschansonwill show you

morefor lookwhere my abridgement comes

[Enter four or five Players]

You are welcomemasterswelcomeallI am glad

to see theewellWelcomegood friendsOmy old

friendthy face is valencedsince I saw thee last

comest thou to beardme in DenmarkWhatmy young

lady and mistressBy>r lady your ladyshipisn

earer to heaven than when I saw you lastby the

altitudeof a chopinePray Godyour voicelike

apieceof uncurrentgoldbe not cracked within the ring

Mastersyou are all welcomeWe>ll e>en

to>tlike French falconersfly at any thing we see

we>ll have a speech straightcomegive us a taste

of your qualitycomea passionatespeech

First Player

What speechmy lord

HAMLET

I heard thee speak me a speech oncebut it was

never actedorif it wasnot above oncefor the

playI rememberpleased not the million>twas

caviareto the generalbut it was ——as I received

itand otherswhose judgments in such matters

cried in the top of mine——an excellent playwell

digested in the scenesset down with as much

modestyas cunningI rememberone said there

were no salletsin the lines to make the matter

savourynor no matter in the phrase that might

indict the author of affectationbut called it an

honest methodas wholeasomeas sweetand by very

much more handsome than fineOne speech in it I

chiefly loved>twas Aeneas>tale to Didoand

thereabout of it especiallywhere he speaks of

Priam's slaughterif it live in your memorybegin

at this linelet me seelet me see——

>The ruggedPyrrhuslike the Hyrcanianbeast>——

it is not so:——it begins with Pyrrhus:——

>The rugged Pyrrhushe whose sablearms

Black as his purposedid the night resemble

When he lay couchedin the ominoushorse

Hathnow this dread and black complexionsmear'd

With heraldrymore dismalhead to foot

Now is he total guleshorridlytrick'd

With blood of fathersmothersdaughterssons

Baked and impastedwith the parchingstreets

That lenda tyrannousand damnedlight

To their lord's murderroastedin wrathand fire

And thus o>er-sized with coagulategore

With eyes like carbunclesthe hellishPyrrhus

Old grandsirePriam seeks>

Soproceed you

LORD POLONIUS

>ForeGodmy lordwell spokenwith good accent and

good discretion

First Player

>Anonhe finds him

Striking too short at Greekshis antiquesword

Rebelliousto his armlies where it falls

Repugnantto commandunequal match'd

Pyrrhus at Priam drivesin ragestrikes wide

But with the whiffand wind of his fell sword

The unnervedfather fallsThen senselessIlium

Seeming to feel this blowwith flamingtop

Stoopsto his baseand with a hideouscrash

Takes prisoner Pyrrhus>earforlohis sword

Which was decliningon the milkyhead

Of reverendPriamseem'd i>the air to stick

Soas a painted tyrantPyrrhus stood

And like a neutralto his will and matter

Did nothing

Butas we often seeagainst some storm

A silence in the heavensthe rackstand still

The boldwinds speechlessand the orbbelow

As hushas deathanonthe dreadful thunder

Doth rendthe regionsoafter Pyrrhus>pause

Aroused vengeance sets him new a-work

And never did the Cyclops>hammers fall

On Mars'sarmourforgedfor proof eterne

With less remorsethan Pyrrhus>bleedingsword

Now falls on Priam

Outoutthou strumpetFortuneAll you gods

In general synod>take away her power

Break all the spokesand felliesfrom her wheel

And bowlthe round navedown the hill of heaven

As low as the fiends>

LORD POLONIUS

This is too long

HAMLET

It shall to the barbers with your beardPrithee

say onhe's for a jigor a tale of bawdryor he

sleepssay oncome to Hecuba

First Player

>But whoOwho had seen the mobledqueen——>

HAMLET

>The mobled queen>

LORD POLONIUS

That's good>mobled queen>is good

First Player

>Run barefootup and downthreatening the flames

With bissonrheuma cloutupon that head

Where latethe diademstoodand for a robe

About her lankand all o>er-teemedloins

A blanketin the alarm of fear caught up

Who this had seenwith tongue in venomsteep'd

>GainstFortune's state would treasonhave

pronounced

But if the gods themselves did see her then

When she saw Pyrrhus make malicioussport

In mincingwith his sword her husband's limbs

The instant burst of clamourthat she made

Unless things mortal move them not at all

Would have made milchthe burning eyes of heaven

And passion in the gods>

LORD POLONIUS

Lookwhether he has not turned his colour and has

tears in'seyesPray youno more

HAMLET

>Tis wellI>ll have theespeak out the rest soon

Good my lordwill you see the players well

bestowedDo you hearlet them be well usedfor

they are the abstract and brief chroniclesof the

timeafter your death you were better have a bad

epitaphthan their ill report while you live

LORD POLONIUS

My lordI will use them according to their desert

HAMLET

God's bodykinsmanmuch betteruse every man

after his desertand who should 'scapewhipping

Use them after your own honour and dignitythe less

they deservethe more meritis in your bounty

Take them in

LORD POLONIUS

Comesirs

HAMLET

Follow himfriendswe>ll hear a play to-morrow

[Exit POLONIUS with all the Players but the First]

Dostthou hear meold friendcan you play the

Murder of Gonzago

First Player

Aymy lord

HAMLET

We>ll ha>tto-morrow nightYou couldfor a need

study a speech of some dozen or sixteen lineswhich

I would set down and insertin>tcould you not

First Player

Aymy lord

HAMLET

Very wellFollow that lordand look you mockhim not

[Exit First Player]

My good friendsI>ll leave you till nightyou are

welcome to Elsinore

ROSENCRANTZ

Good my lord

HAMLET

AysoGod be wi>ye

[Exeunt ROSENCRANTZ and GUILDENSTERN]

Now I am alone

OWhat a rogue and peasant slave am I

Is it not monstrousthat this player here

But in a fictionin a dream of passion

Could force his soul so to his own conceit

That from her workingall his visagewann'd

Tears in his eyesdistractionin'saspect

A broken voiceand his whole function suiting

With forms to his conceitand all for nothing

For Hecuba

What's Hecuba to himor he to Hecuba

That he should weep for her What would he do

Had he the motiveand the cuefor passion

That I haveHe would drownthe stage with tears

And cleavethe general ear with horridspeech

Make mad the guiltyand appalthe free

Confoundthe ignorantand amaze indeed

The very facultiesof eyes and earsYet I

A dull and muddy-mettledrascalpeak

Like John-a-dreamsunpregnantof my cause

And can say nothingnonot for a king

Upon whose property and most dear life

A damn'ddefeat was madeAm I a coward

Who calls me villainbreaks my pateacross

Plucksoff my beardand blows it in my face

Tweaksme by the nosegives me the lie i>the throat

As deep as to the lungswho does me this

Ha

'swoundsI should take itfor it cannot be

But I am pigeon-liver'dand lack gall

To make oppression bitteror erethis

I should have fattedall the region kites

With this slave's offalbloodybawdyvillain

Remorselesstreacherouslecherouskindless villain

Ovengeance

Whywhat an assam IThis is most brave

That Ithe son of a dear father murder'd

Promptedto my revengeby heaven and hell

Mustlike a whoreunpack my heart with words

And fall a-cursinglike a very drab

A scullion

Fie upon>tfohAboutmy brainI have heard

That guilty creaturessitting at a play

Have by the very cunningof the scene

Been struck so to the soul that presently

They have proclaim'd their malefactions

For murderthough it have no tonguewill speak

With most miraculousorganI>ll have these players

Play something like the murder of my father

Before mine uncleI>ll observe his looks

I>ll tent him to the quickif he but blench

I know my courseThe spirit that I have seen

May be the deviland the devil hath power

To assume a pleasing shapeyeaand perhaps

Out of my weakness and my melancholy

As he is very potentwith such spirits

Abusesme to damnmeI>ll have grounds

More relative than thisthe play's the thing

whereinI>ll catch the conscienceof the king

[Exit]


 

Previous    Next    Chinese

 
 
上一级

讨论区